Road Tripping With Toddlers

7 am on Tuesday we left on a 10 hour drive with my (almost) 3 year old and my 18 month old. Now, they’re fairly well behaved children most of the time, but any normal mother or father reading that statement would probably be struck with fear.

Always travel at night if you’re in a hurry!!

If you’re in a rush to get where you’re going and you’re traveling with toddlers, the absolute safest bet is to travel at night whenever possible for the obvious reason, they’ll SLEEP. No need for entertainment, or multiple stops, or temper tantrums. You’ll ( most likely ) have a smooth, uncomplicated ride.

We, on the other hand, overslept our 2 am alarm and left at 7 am. Packing up the kids, I found myself mentally preparing for a very, very, long and emotional drive.

Thankfully, we were not in any hurry to get where we were going so we were able to stop every hour or so.

The trick is to stop and let them run at almost every rest stop you can find! If you let them run out their energy before, I REPEAT, BEFORE!!!! they get whiney, you’ll generally save yourself a lot of heartache. Once you pass the threshold into tantrum-town, there’s no going back.

The 10 hour trip turned into 14 hours. But, we managed to not have one single accident, one single tantrum, or one single argument.  They were incredibly well behaved and I was so very thankful.

If there is one thing I’ve learned as a mother of two toddlers under the age of 3?  Take. Your. Time. Don’t get in a hurry, you run on their time. Try to deny it, go on, try. If they’re not happy, no one is happy. So just take your time, make that extra stop. It may cost you an extra 15-20 minutes, but it’ll save a massive headache and a lot of discomfort for both the kid(s) and you.

-“Mommy”

Author: smudgesonmymirror

A dynamic mother/daughter duo that has overcome obstacles and chosen to embrace our experiences rather than to change our view of ourselves. Lovingly labeled by Gigi or Mommy, the tone and messages in each post will reflect generational viewpoints and family continuances.

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